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Young People

Helping children and young people to build their skills, confidence and aspirations.

  • The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge sat with the queen

    Queen Elizabeth II Fields Challenge

    The Queen Elizabeth II Fields Challenge led by Fields in Trust, aims to protect 2,012 outdoor recreational spaces by the end of 2012.

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    The Duchess of Cambridge talking to some children The Queen Elizabeth II Fields Challenge is a Fields in Trust playing field legacy programme to mark Her Majesty The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012. The Challenge was launched by The Duke of Cambridge in June 2010, to protect permanently 2,012 outdoor recreational spaces in communities across the country by 2012. The Challenge will benefit current and future generations as a legacy to the landmark occasion of the 2012 Jubilee.

    In 2011 The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry made its first grant in support of the Challenge to enable Fields in Trust to create an online toolkit for local communities to nominate sites to protect in their local areas. The grant also covers the costs of protecting the first five sites and then the 500th, 1000th, 1500th and 2012th fields to inspire others to support. In addition, the Foundation has helped secure a £1million donation from the London Marathon Charitable Trust to protect fields in London and provide vital improvement grants on protected sites.

  • The Duchess of Cambridge sat on a log in the work with children

    Outdoor Residential Trips for Young People

    The Foundation is supporting projects providing outdoor residential trips for young people to help build their confidence and aspirations.

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    The Duchess of Cambridge sat on a log in the work with children In the UK, the Foundation is working with Absolute Return for Kids (ARK) to build the case for outdoor challenges and experiences as an integral part of both primary and secondary school education. The aim is to build a solid evidence base for ‘rite of passage’ wilderness experiences for young people in Year 9 and outdoor challenges for primary school children in Year 6.

    Aside from short residential trips for primary and secondary schools, the Foundation is working with Skill Force to develop longer, targeted outdoor challenges for young people who are, or are becoming, disengaged from education. These will be undertaken throughout the school year for smaller groups with the aim of helping participants to regain their confidence and self-esteem, and understand the benefits of reengaging with their education. The trips will be followed up by intensive mentoring and support in schools, focused on helping students to maintain the momentum gained on the residential trips, and working with the school and local authorities to solve some of the root causes of their behavioural problems.

  • Ugandan school children

    Secondary School Education in Uganda

    Through a public/private partnership model, the Foundation and Absolute Return for Kids (ARK) are working to improve secondary education in Uganda.

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    Ugandan school children The Foundation is working with ARK to improve secondary education in impoverished communities in Uganda, where less than 25% of children are able to attend secondary school. The public/private partnership model hopes to help address this issue by providing quality education more cost effectively through a local partner – Promoting Equality in African Schools (PEAS).

    The first two private/public secondary schools were opened in March 2012, with the full support of the Ugandan Government. We are delighted that the Government has now confirmed its intention to provide financial support both for building the schools and ongoing tuition costs. We hope the public/private partnership model will be ongoing with other schools currently under development.

  • A man playing ping pong

    Coach Core

    The Foundation is working with Greenhouse Charity to pilot a new model for improving sports coaching in schools and communities.

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    A man playing ping pong There is widespread agreement that sport has a fundamental role to play in the engagement and education of children and young people. However, evidence suggests that young people from disadvantaged communities are less likely to receive even the recommended minimum of three hours of quality sport each week.

    The Foundation has been working with Greenhouse Charity to test the viability of a new model for improving the availability and quality of sports coaching in schools and communities. Together we are piloting Coach Core, a new programme for school or higher education leavers to train as professional sports coaches whilst they are still in education.

    The project aims to improve the quality and availability of sports coaching and mentoring in inner city schools whilst creating employment at a time when many young people are facing long term unemployment.

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